As some people know, I run a web development agency called Cohoda LTD.

As part of our service, like most development agencies, we offer web hosting. To keep things as lean as possible, we deliberately don’t try to host email servers ourselves, instead we set up clients with email on Google GSuite (or Office 365 if the client prefers)
I always (where possible) use CloudFlare for DNS, and found myself repeatedly entering the same MX records for each domain, time and time again.

CloudFlare has a handy “Upload DNS File” feature tucked under ‘Advanced’ at the bottom of your DNS entries.

Here, you can specify any file to upload (which must conform to the BIND format to work)
On upload, those DNS entries will be added.

Here’s one for quickly adding GSuite (Google Apps / Gmail) mx records to CloudFlare:

Simply save this as (for example) gsuite-cloudflare.txt and upload that when you want to quickly add Google Apps mx records to your domain in CloudFlare.

Search git branch names using command line

Looking for a particular branch, and git branch -a returns a LOT of branches?
If on Windows, you could use the Search feature in cmder (you’re using cmder, right?)

Or on mac, cmd+f and then search the outputted text…

OR you could use one of these two approaches:

1)
git branch takes a --list argument , which in turn takes a search arg.
Example:

git branch -a --list *something*

Will return only the branches containing the word “something” (note the wildcard character)

2)
The alternative, if in bash / bash compatible terminal (git bash / cmder etc… on Windows – normal Command Prompt won’t work – unless you’ve got bash extensions installed) is to pipe the result to grep:

git branch -a | grep something

Both methods here will yield the same results.

Side note:
-a shows all local and remote branches
-r shows only remote branches

color-themes.com according to it’s description, offers “Color themes for IntelliJ IDEA, Webstorm, PyCharm, RubyMine, PhpStorm and AppCode”

However, it turns out that these themes also work with Rider.

After downloading it (it’s a .jar file) go to File > Import Settings

Choose the downloaded .jar file, and it will import the colour theme.
Once Rider restarts, the theme will be available, and your editor will have switched to that theme

Important:

Unlike Visual Studio, there’s actually two places the colours are configured.
One, is Appearance > Theme:

This governs how the application looks (not how your fonts look)
Light, or Dark (Darcula)

To change the font colours / style, you’ll need to go to Editor > Colors & Fonts > Font
You can then select the Scheme

Notice ‘Solarized Dark’ is now in that list

My preference, however, is the Visual Studio Dark theme (coming from a Windows VS background!)

An Introduction to the LEDS Stack

While developing an Azure Function application, using this tutorial, I encountered a problem.

Ultimately, using func new generated my function (the run.csx file) which looked like this:

Side note: the mySbMsg is important – it’s defined in the function.json bindings, and must match.
function.json

However, there was a problem.
When sending messages to my topic, they weren’t being picked up by my function.

I was using some very simplistic code to send messages to my topic:

The messages were definitely being delievered to the topic – I could see that in the Azure portal.

However, the function wasn’t picking them up.

The issue was around the string mySbMsg parameter.
The scaffolding assumed that it would be a string – but it is in fact, a byte[] (due to me serializing the JSON)

Changing this parameter to be a byte[] – and my messages are now received by my locally running function.

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